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I 



» 

4 






* 


4 







U S T R A L I A N 

ORC H I DS. 


R. I). FITZGERALD, F.L.S. 


VOLUME I. 



b OoL O 

SYDNEY: 

THOMAS RICHARDS, GOVERNMENT PRINTER. 

18 8 2 . 










THIS WORK 


ON THE 


AUSTRALIAN ORCHIDS 


flctiicatcti to tfic jHcmorg 


OF THE LATE 


CHARLES DARWIN, 


AS A TOKEN OF 



THE VENERATION IN WHICH THAT GREAT NATURALIST AND FEARLESS EXPOUNDER OF SCIENCE IS HELD 


BY 


TITE AUTHOR. 













s-YisroiFSis. 













Australian 


By whom 
named. 

Where ami 
when named 

Culony. 

Species. 

Why to named. 

By whom 

" “* he " 

Colony. 

font- 

Terrestrial 

Orchids. 

Genus, 



Epiphytal' 



li 










orwlf" 

■i | 

i 

Aciuntlnia . 

R. Brown 

Prodromus 

N.S.W., V., 

eaudatus ... 

Tailed, from the length of the 

It. Brown 

Prod., 321, 1810 

N.S.3V., T. ... 

Ins.... 

Torres.. 

I 

7 

0 

aKT)(ukr)a j«>int 
and av0os (an- 


1810. 

S.A., Q., T. 

exsertus. 

petals and sepals. 

Protruding, from the bending 
forward of the column. 



N.S.3V., V., 



I 

1 

5 

thoa) a flower. 







S.A., 33'.A. 









foraieatus... 

Forked, from the form of the 



N.S.W., <J. ... 



I 

1 

5 






sepals. 





Ter. near 




Adenoolrilus . 

Hooker ... 

18.38 . 

N.S.W. 

Nortoui. 

Norton’s, discovered by James 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orcli., \ oh 

N.S.3V. 


I 

2 


aSi/v (adcli) a 





Norton, Sydney. 

I, Part 2, 1870. 



Kpiphy. 




gland and xriAos 
(eheiloB) a lip. 

Thouars... 








Kpiphy. 



10 

Bolbophyllum .. 

Hist, des 

N.S.3V., Q. ... 

Shepherdi... 

Shepherd's, named in honor of 

Mueller... 

Frag., Ilf, 40, 
1862,dedicated, 

N.S.33'., y. ... 

„ »• • 

I 

5 

0oA/3or(l>olbos)a 


Plantes, 


J. 33’. Shepherd, of Sydney. 








bulb and ifivWtiy 


OrchiilOos. 




1859. 







(phyllon) a leaf. 


t. 95,1822. 












Culadcnia . 

R. Brown 

Pro<i„ 

N.S.W., V., 

alba . 

33'hite, from the colour of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 323, 1810 

N.S.W. 


Terres.. 

I 

7 

1 

koAos (kalos) 


1810. 

S.A., W.A., 


flower. 


Aus. Orcli., 3'ul. 






8 

beautiful and 



Q., T. 

arcuaria. 

Belonging to sand, found grow¬ 

Fitzgerald 


M *•* 


I 


oSi|»< (adcli) a 




ing on Mind-hills. 

I. Part 7. 1882. 

n.s.w., y.. 






gland. 




enmea . 

Pinkish, from the colour of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 324, 1810 

,, ... 


I 

7 

1 





flower. 



V., S.A..T. 









clavigera ... 

Club-bearing, the sepals being 

A. Cun¬ 

LindL, Gen. and 

N.S.33'., V.,T. 

ti ••• 

. 1 1 

2 

3 





clavatc. 

ningham 

Sp. Orcli., 422. 

N.S.33'., V. ... 









caru lea. 

Light-blue, from the colour of 

R. Brown 

Prod., 324, 1810 

,i ... 

.. I 

5 

8 






the flower. 












concolor ... 

One coloured, stem and flower, Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orel)., Vol. 

N.S.3V. 


„ ..J L 

7 

8 






being red-brown. 

Hooded, the dorsal sepal hooding 


1. Part 7, 1882. 










oucullata ... 


Aus. Orcli., 3'ol. 

„ ......... 



l 

2 

4 






the column. 


1, Part 2, 1870. 











deformis ... 

Deformed, the sei»als differing in 

R. Brown 

Prod,, 324, 1810 

N.S.33'., 3*., 

„ ... 

«» — 

I 

5 

8 






shape from other Coladeuiaa (?) 



3V.A., T. 










dilatata. 

Dilated, from the broad lobes of 


Prod., 325, 1810 

N.S.33'.,33'. A., 


it 

I 

3 







the labclltim. 



S.A. 










dimorpha ... 

Two-shaped, being found of two Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orel)., 3*ol. 

N.S.33’. 

» ... 

n — 

I 

1 

3 





forms. 


I, Part 1, 1875. 

N.S.33*., S.A., 










lilamentoaa 

3Yith filaments, from the long 

R. Brown 

Prod., 324, 1810 



I 


0 





te-ssellata ... 

points of the sepals and petals. | 
Tessellated, the labelluni being Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orcli., 3ol. 

W.A., T. 
N.S.33'. 



I 

2 

3 






paved with ealli. 

Tiled, from crowded calli or 


I. Part 2, IS70. 











testncea. 

It. Brown 

Prod., 324, 1810 

N.S.33*., v./r. 



I 


4 






colour of flower (?) 



N.S.W., T. ... 










Patorsoni 

Paterson's, in honor of the col¬ 



99 -•* 


I 

3 







lector (in Tasmania). 



N.S.33*., Q. ... 


m .1 

ler. near 




Cabin the. 

R. Brown 

Bot. Reg., 
573. 

N.S.W., Q. ... 

vcratrifoliuni 

3'cratrum-leaved, leaves being 
like those of a veratrum. 


Bot. Reg., 573.. 


I 

4 

4 

koAoi (klllosl 

beautiful and 



Epiphy. i 











ai/0oy (antlioa) a 
flower. 














(.'alcana . 


I’rod..329, 

N.S.W., Q.,V., 

major. 

Larger, the larger of the New 


Prod,, 329, 1810 

N.S.33'., y.. 

99 ... 

Torres.. 

I 

6 

l 

after George 
Coley. 


1810. 

W.A., T. 

South 33'alcs species. 

Smaller, the smaller of the New 



V., T. 

N.S.33'., T. ... 



I 

G 

1 






South 33'alcs species. 



N.S.33’., Q., T. 

Self... 





t'aloohilua . 

„ 

Pri id., 320, 

N.S.W., Q.,V., 

campcstria.. 

Dwelling in a plain, being found 

M 

Prod., 320, 1S10 


1 

4 

6 

ko\oi (kaloH) 


1810. 

T. 

on plains. 



N.S.33*. 






beautiful and 
XtiAos (chcilos) 
a lip. 




paludoaua ... 

Marshy, being found in marshes 

n 

Aus. Orcb., 3*ol. 

Ins.... 


I 

4 

6 



(.'biloglottis . 


Prod., 323, 

N.S.33*., y.,V., 

formieifera.. 

Ant-heating, from form of gland Fitzgerald 

„ ......... 

it ••• 

I 

3 

9 

xn\at (eheiloa) 


1310. 

T. 


on the labollum. 


1, Part 3, 1877. 







alipand yAuatra 




trajieziformo 

Trapezium, shaped, from the 
form of the labcllum. 


Aus. Orcli., Vol. 

,, •-•••••- 

•i 

it — 

I 

3 

9 

(glosaa) a 





J, Part 3, 1877- 







tongue. 

C'leisostoma . 

Blumc ... 

Flora 

N.S.W., Q. . 

erccta. 

Erect, from the erect habit of the 


Aus. Orcli., Vol. 



Epiphy. 

I 

4 

5 

k At liras (klcisosi 


Neder¬ 


plant. 


I, Part 4, 1878. 

N.S.33’., Q. ... 






dosed and 


land In¬ 


tridentatum 

Three-toothed, from the form of 

1 Limlley .. 

Bot. Reg., 1838 

V* ... 

■i 

I 


9 

<r ro/M (stoma) n 


die, 302. 



the centre lobe of the label- 









mouth. 


| 1825. 



lum (?) 



Q., N.A. 






C'idandrin . 

Fitzgerald 

Aus.Oreb., 

Q. 

Smillia* . 

Smillics, in honor of Mrs. E. J. 
Smillie, South Australia. 

Mueller... 

Frag., Vol. VI, 94 



1 



koiAoj (koiloal 

Vol. 1, 









hollow and ayrip 


Part 7, 












(aner) ft man. 
Corysantlies - 

R. Brown 

Prod.,328, 

N.S.W..Q., V., 

biealearatu.. 

Two-spurred, tholabellum having 

R. Brown 

Prod., 328, 1810 

N.S.33*., Q. ... 

... 

Terres.. 

1 

2 

10 

Kopus (korysi 
a hclniA and 


1810. 

S. A., W.A., 

T. 

timbriata ... 

two spurs. 

Fimbriate, from the fringed 



N.S.33 r . 



1 

1 

4 

or Cluj (anthos) a 





margins of the laliclltim. 


Lind., Gen. and 







flower. 




pruinoaa ... 

Frosty, from the surface of the 

A. Cun- 


,, ••• 

»• *V 

1 

1 

4 





lower side of the leaf resem¬ 

ninghnm 

Sp. Orch., 393. 








w 




bling hoar-frost. 

Like a little finger-nail, from the 











unguieuluta. 

R. Brown 

Prod., 328, 1810 

,, 

» * * 

It 

I 

2 

10 





shape of the flower (?) 









Cryptostylis . 


Prod., 317, 

N.S.W..Q..V., 

croeta. 

Erect, the labullum being erect. 

„ 

Prod., 317, 1810 

„ . 

99 


1 

3 

8 

Xpmrria (crypto) 

to conceal and 


1814 

W.A., T. 
N.S.W. 

leptoehiln ... 

Narrow-lipped, from the strap- 
shaped labelltim. 

Mueller... 

FI. Aus., Vol. VI. 



99 

I 

3 

8 

(ttu\oj (stylos) n 





334, 1S73. 







style. 

tyrtostvlis. 


Prod.,322, 

N.S.W., Q., V*., 

reniformia 

Kidney-shaped, from the shape 

R. Brown 

Prod., 322. 

N.S.33'., 3'., 

S.A., 33’.A., 

>1 ••• 


I 

4 

8 

Kupros (eyrtos] 

i 

1810. 

S.A., W.A., 


of the leaf. 








curved and 
trrvAos (stylos) n 



T. 





T. 






sty lc. 

Dcndrobiuni . 

.Swartz ... 

Hortus 

N.S.W., Q„ 

icmulum ... 

Emulous, rivalling other Demlro- 

R. Brown 

Prod., 333, 1810 

N.S.W., Q. ... 


Epiphy. 

I 

2 

5 

itvSpov (den- 


Kewcnsis 

V., T. 


bituna (?) 


Frag., Vol. 3’, 

N.S.W. 



I 



dron) a tree and 


1799. 


Bcekleri. 

Heckler's, afterBeckler, a natura¬ 

Mueller... 




G 

Bios (bios) life. 





list and collector in Aus¬ 
tralia. 


95, 1866. 











oaualieula- 

Channelled, from the form of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 333, 1810 




1 

3 

0 





tum. 

leaf. 

Like a cucumber, from the form 
of the leaf. 

“ 33'. S. 


N.S.33’. 



I 

6 

3 






Muoleay' 
(Mueller), 
f Fitzgerald 






Falcon-beaked, from the form ol 






falcoroatria 

i Aus. Orch., Vol. 



. 1 1 

6 

3 






the labollum. 

I, Part 5, 1879 

















































































SYNOPSIS— continued. 


ii 













Australian 










frrth 

Terrestrial 



Genus. 

By whom 

Where ami 
when name* 

Colony. 

Specie* 

Why so named. 

By whom 
immetl. 

Where aml^vrhen 

Colony. 

1 teed,by 
o'rseh! 

Epiphytal. 

■i 

$ 

It 













£. 


Detulrobium . 

Swartz .. 

Hortus 

N.S.W., Q. 

monophyl- 

Onodcafed, the pseudo-bulb gen¬ 
erally having only one leaf. 
Moore's, in honor of C. Moore, 

Mueller... 

Frag., Yol. 1,189, 

N.S.W. 

Ins... 

Epiphy. 

I 

6 

9 

— contiiiunl. 


Kewcnsi 

V., T. 

Ium. 


1869. 




I 

7 

10 



1799. 


Moorei . 


Frag., VoL VII, 










Director of Botanical Gardens, 
1 Sydney. 

Like a butterfly, from the appear- 


•29, 1870. 











phahenopBis 

Fitzgerald 

(:.-n .1. < hi. .ii.. Vo!. 

Q.- 


„ ... 

I 

7 

5 





j ance of the flowers. 


XIV, 38, 1S80 

Q., N.A. 










rigidum. 

Rigid, from the liahit of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 333, 1810 

” - 

** •” 

1 

4 

7 

Dipodium . 

Sir (dis) double 
and iroSut (po 
dos) of a foot. 

R. Brown 

Prod.,331 
1810. 

N.S.W., Q. 
V., S.A., T. 

piuictatuin. 

| plant. 

Spotted, the flowers being spot¬ 
ted with pur]de. 

» 

Prod., Ml, 1810 

N.S.W., Q., 

V., S.A., T. 


Tor. near 
Epiphy. 

Terres.. 

I 

7 

4 

Ditiris. 

.Smith 

Trans. Lin 

N.8.W., Q. 

.•equalis. 

Equal, from the equality of the 

Mueller... 

Fl.Aus., Vol.Vl, 

N.S.W. 

it •• 

I 

2 

6 

Sir (dia) double 


Socs. IV 

V., S. A. 

three lobes of the labellum. 


328, 1873. 





7 


and vpa (ura) a 


•>•22,1798 

W.A., T. 

denilro- 

Dcmlrobium-like, flowers lieing 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 

„ ......... 

it 

i* 


* 

taxi. 




bioides. 

like a dendrobium. 

I, Part 7, 1882 

N.S.W., V. ... 










elongnta 

Lengthened, from the great 

R. Brown 

Prod., 310, 1810 


ft •“ 

* 

* 






moeulata .. 

length of the sepals. 

Spotted, from the brown marks 

Smith . 

Exot.Bot.,Vol.I, 

N.S.W., Q., 

»! ... 

. 

I 

2 

6 






on the flowers. 


67, t. 30. 

V., S.A., T. 










pedunculuta 

Pendunclcd, the flowers being on 

R. Brown 

Prod., 316, 1810 

N.S.W., V., 


II 

I 

7 

3 





long pedicels. 



S.A., T. 










sccundi flora 

Flowers on one side, from the 

Fitzgerald 

Ana. Orch., Vol. 

N.S.W. 

if *•> 

It ••• 

I 

4 

9 






form of the raceme. 

I, Part 4, 1878 



Ter. near 



10 


Lourciro.. 


N.S.VV..V..Q. 


A. Cun¬ 
ningham. 

Lind., Bot. Reg., 
1828. 

N.S.W., Q., V. 


I 

3 

galea a leather 
helmet. 



laurel. 


Epiphy. 





R. Brown 

Prod.,326, 
1810. 



Larger, lmiug the larger of the 
New South Wales species. 

R. Brown 

Prod., 326, 1810 

N.S.W., Q.. 


Terres.. 

I 

4 


yAuanra (glossa) 



V., S.A., T. 




4 









„ 1810 

N.S.W., (J., 



I 


*i8or(eidos)like. 





New South Wales. 


V., S.A. 






Lyperanthus. 


Prod. ,325, 

N.S.W., V., 

cllipticus ... 

Elliptical, from the form of the 


Prod., 325, 1810 

N.S.W. 


•• 

I 

1 

6 

Aarapos (liparos) 


1810. 

W.A., T. 

leaves. 








10 

shining and 




nigricans ... 

Becoming black, from the plant 


„ 

X.S.W., V., 


i> ••• 

I 

4 

arflos (authos) a 




blackening in drying. 



W.A., T. 





10 

flower. 




suaviolens .. 

Sweet-scented, the flower having 



N.S.W., V., 

ft *.f 


I 

4 






a sweet perfume in bright sun¬ 
shine.* 

Contracted, from the narrow 



T. 






Orthocoras. 


Prod.,317, 

N.S.W., V., 

strictum ... 


Prod., 317, 1810 

N.S.W., V.. 

Self... 

»i «»» 

I 

3 

1 

opOot (orthos) 
straight and 
Ktpas (ceras) a 
horn. 


1S10. 

S.A. 


shape of the flower. 



S.A. 






Prasophyllum ... 
vpturos (prasos) 
green and 


Prod.,318, 
1810. 

N.8.W., Q.,V., 

S. A., W.A., 

T. 

fimbriatum 

flavum . 

Fimbriate, from the hairs of the 
labellum. 

Yellow, from the colour of thu 


Prod., 319, 1810 

Prod., 318, 1810 

N.S.W. 



I 

5 

1 



N.S.W., S.A., 


I 

3 

7 

^wAAor(pbyllon) 
a leaf. 





flower. 

Turning black, from the flowers 
blackening in drying. 


Prod, 319, 1810 

T. 

N.S.W., S.A.. 



I 

5 

1 



nigneaua 


! t. 









striatum ... 

Streaked, the flowers being 
streaked with purple. 
Acuminate, the labellum being 


Prod., 31S, 1810 

N.S.W. 

” 


I 

3 

7 

Pterostylis. 

„ Prod.,326, 

N.S.W..Q..V.. 

acuminata. . 


Prod., 326, 1810 



It 

I 

5 

7 

irrrpoi (pteros)a 

] 1S10. 

S.A., W.A., 


pointed. 









wing and ittvAos 
(styTos)acolumn 


T. 

Baptist ii ... 

Baptist’s, from the name of the 

Fitzgerald 

Aus, Orch., VoL 



It 

I 

1 

2 



barbata . 

collector, J. Baptist. 

Bearded, labellum being bearded. 

Lindley .. 

I, Parti, 1875 
Gen. and Sp. 

N.S.W., V., 



I 

7 

7 





Orch., 388. 

S.A., W.A.,T. 










eoecina . 

Red, from the colour of the 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Yol. 

J N.S.W. 


II - 

I 

4 

3 






flower. 

1, Part 4, 1878 











concinna ... 

Neat, from the delicate form of 

R. Brown 

Prod., 326, 1810 

N.S.W., V. ... 

i» ••• 

It 

I 

6 

4 






the plant. 













curta . 

Short, from the form of the 
galea. 



N.S.W., V., 



1 

5 

6 








i S.A., T, 










cycnocepbala 

Swan’s-head, the appendage to 
the labellum being like a 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 
I, Part 2, 1876 

N.S.W. 

” ... 

I. ... 

I 

2 

7 






swan's head. 













Daintreyana 

Daintrey’s, having been discov¬ 
ered by E. Daintrey, Sydney. 
Rather rough, from the rough¬ 

Mueller... 

FI. Aus., Vol. VL, 

.. 


If — 

I 

6 

7 






360, 1873. 











hispidula .. 

Fitzgerald Aus. Oreh., Yol. 

«, ......... 


ft .- 

I 

6 

5 





ness on stem and flowers. 


I, Forte, 1880 











lougifolia ... 

Long-leaved, from the form of 

R. Brown 

Prod., 3‘27, 1810 

, N.S.W.. V., 

„ ... 

It ... 

I 

| 1 

1 





the leaves. 



S.A., T. 










Milchelli ... 

Mitchell's, from the name of the 

Lindley... 

Mitch.Trop.Aus., 

N.S.W., Q., 

ii — 

It ... 

I 

1 6 

6 






discoverer, Sir Thomas Mit¬ 
chell. 

365. 












mutica . 

Changeable, being a variable 
plant. 

Nodding, from the drooping of 
the flowers. 

R. Brown 

Prod., 328, 1810 

N.S.W. 

... 

It - 

I 


7 





nutans . 


Prod., 327, 1810 

N.S.W., Q., 



I 

6 

5 







S.A., T. 










obtusn . 

Obtuse, from the blunt point of 


u 

N.S.W., T. ... 


II 

I 

6 

7 






the labellum. 













ophioglossa.. 

Addcr-tongucd, labellum being 


Prod., 326, 1810 

| N.S. W., Q. ... 


,1 .. 

I 

6 

4 





parviflora ... 

Small-flowered, from the size of 


Prod., 327, 1810 

1 N.S.W., Q . 


I 

7 

7 





the flowers. 



V.. T. 









pedoglossa... 

Rudder-tongued, laliellum lieing 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 

N.S.W. . 

II -• 

I 

3 

5 





like an ancient rudder. 

I, Part 3. 1877 










pedunculata 

Pedunoled, the flowers beiug on 
pedicels. 

Rellexed, from the point of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 327, 1810 

N.S.W., T. ... „ .. 

If .... 

I 

5 

C 





reflexa . 



N.S.W., V., „ ... 


I 

5 

7 






labellum lieing curved. 



W.A. 









rufa . 

Red, from the colour of the 

■ 

i, 

N.S.W . ... 

If •“ 



8 






flower. 












striata . 

Striate, the flowers being streaked 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 


II ... 

I 

3 

5 






with green. 

I, Part 3, 1877 










squamata ... 

Scaly, from the numerous bracts 

R. Brown 

Prod., 3-27, 1810 


, 

I 

6 

6 





on the flower-stem. 












truncata ... 

Cut-short, from the truncate 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 



1 

4 

3 






form of the galea. 

Woolla', from the discoverer, Dr. 

I, Part 4, 1S7S 











Woollsii. 


Aus. Orch., Vol. 




1 


8 






Woolls, Richmond. 


I, Part 2, 1S76 







■Saccolabiuin . 

Linilley... 


N.S.W., Q. ... 

Hillii . 

Hill’s, from the discoverer,^Walter 

Mueller.. 

Frag., Vol. J, 

N.S.W., Q. ... 

... 

Epipby. 

I 

2 

9 

saceus a sack 
and labium a 
lip. 

Sarcochilns. 



Hill, Director of the Botanical 
Gardens, Brisbane. 


192, 1859. 








R. Brown 

Prad.,332, 

N.S.W., Q., 

divitiflorus.. 

Rich-flowered, from number and 


FL Aus., Vol. VI, 



I 

6 

10 

(sarx) flesh 


1 MO. 

T., V. 


beauty of the flowers. 


292, 1873. 





nndxt<Aor(choi- 




faleatuB. 

Falcate, from the sickle-form of 

R. Brown 

Prod., 332, 1810 

N.S.W. „ ... 


I 

5 

3 

los) a lip. 





the leaves. 










Fitzgeraldi.. 

Fitzgerald’s, from the name of 

Mueller... 

Frag., Vol. VII, 

n |( ... 


I 

3 

3 




the discoverer, R. D. Fitz¬ 


97 and 115,1870 










liiliii. 

gerald, Sydney. 

Hill's, in honor of W. Hill, 


Frag., Vol. H, 94, 

N.S.W., Q. ... . 


I 

5 

5 






Director of the Botanic Gul¬ 
dens, Brisbane. 


1860. 










montauus ... 

Mountain, found growing on the 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 

N.S.W. „ ... 


1 

5 

3 






mountains. 

I. Part 5, 1879 







A* otwrvud by A. (!. Hamilton, at UuntaWMi?. 



















































































SYN OPSIS — continued. 


I By whom 
1 named. 


R. Brown 


Spothoglottis. 

irwaSrj (spatlle) 
n spat he ami 
yKuatra (glossa) 

Spirantfms . 

(Tirufa. (spira) a 
screw and avOas 
(anthos)aHowcr 
Thelymitra. 

8r)\ui (theltls) 
female and giTpa 
(mitra) a cap. 


Blame . 


L. C. 
Richard 


Forster ... 


Where nml 
when named. 



Why ao named. 


Where and when 


ferti- 

illMS-U 
or self. 

Terrestrial 

Epiphytal 

Australian 

Orchids. 


Species 

■i 

1 


Prod.,332, 

N.S.W., Q„ 

olivaccus ... 

Olive-like, leaves being like those 

Linillcy .. 

Bot. Reg., 1839, 

N.S.W..Q. ... 

Ins.... 

Epiphy. 

I 

5 

5 

1810. 

T. t V. 


of an olive (?) 


Misc. 32. 









parvifloms 

Small-flowered, proliably smallest 


Bot. Reg., 1838, 

N.S.W., V., T. 

«» • •• 

ii ••• 

I 

3 

4 




known when named. 


Misc. 34. 







. Bijilrngen, 

Q. 



M uellor... 

Frag., Vol. VI, 

Q. 

Self or 

Ter. ucar 

I 

G 

8 

400,1823 



ltiehemond of Paris. 


93, 1867. 


Ins. 

Epiphy. 




Mcnm. da 

N.S.W., Q., 

Australis ... 

Australian, the species found in 

R. Brown 

Prod., 319, 1810 

N.S.W., Q., 

Self... 

Ter res. 

1 

2 

1 

Museum 

V., T. 


Australia. 



V., T. 






Paris, IV 












40 .’,. 1818 

N.S.W., Q., V., 

carnea . 

Pink, from the colour of the 


Prod., 314, 1S10 

N.S.W., V.,T. 

» • 

i, - 

I 

G 

2 


8.A., W.A.. 


flower. 

1 ” 









T. 

circumscpta 

Inclosed, from the wings of 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch..Vol. I, 

N.S.W. 

» — 


I 

4 

1 




the column surrounding the 


Part 4. 1878. 









longifolia ... 

stigma, 

Long-leaved, from the long leaves 

Forster ... 

Char. Gen., 98, 

N.S.W., S.A., 

„ ... 

» •. 

I 

6 

2 




on the (lower-stem. 


t. 49. 









media. 

Intermediate (betweenT.ixioides 

R. Brown 

Prod., 314, 1810 

N.S.W., T. .. 

» — 


I 

4 

1 




and T. canaliculata ?) 











niegcalyptra 

Largc-hoodeil, the hood of the 

Fitzgerald 

Aus. Orch., Vol. 

N.S.W. 

Ins.... 


I 

5 

2 




column being larger than in 


I, Part 5, 1879. 









nuila . 

others. 

Naked, the central lobe of the 

R. Brown 

Prod., 314, 1810 

N.S.W., W.A. 

Self... 

ii ... 

I 

5 

2 




hood being smooth. 











pauciflora ... 

Few-flowered, producing gene¬ 

„ 

,i 

N .ft. \\ ,, S. A.. 

n ••• 

ii — 

I 

15 

2 




rally only one flower. 



W.A. 



















































SYNOPSIS OD DISTRIBUTION. 




' Hunter's Hill 

! Kurrajong. 

I’ye's ('reck . 

ifuntor’* Hill . 

Mount Wilson . 


Hunter's Hill 

Ballina . 

Mount Wiliion . 


Nortoni.... 
Shepherd!. 


C&ladenia ... alba .. . 


clavigora 


dimorpha.. 


Blue Mountains 

Parramatta. 

Sydney". 

Blue Mountains 

Parramatta . 

Spencer’s G ulf... 


Mount Victoria... 

Woodford . 

Katoomba . 


Sydney . 

Richmond River 
Blue Mountains 

Cooyal . 

< i untawang 
Moniya ... 
Parramatta 
Blue Mountains 


VV.A. 

S.A. 

N.'.W 


Red bank Creek... 


BsUcnden . 

Hunter's Hill... 
Pyc’s Creek 


Deuiliqnin Statiou 

Cunningham Plains 
Baudesert Hills 
(very local) 

Hunters Ilill. 

Pye’s Creek .. 

Mount Wilson . 

Dcniliquin Station 

Cunningham Plains 
Mount Lofty Range 


Maeleay River.. 

Pieton . 

Bellinger River 

Ker Ranges. 

Sydney . 

Parramatta . 

Liverpool. 

Denilnjuin . 

Ik-thiuigra . 

Miirrumhurroh 
G untawang. 


Sydney . 

Parramatta 
Blue Mountains 
Cootamundra . 
Dcniliquin .... 
Bethuugra ... 
Murrumlmrrah 

Adelaide . 

Hobart. 




Beandesert Hills ... 
Reedy Creek. 


Bethungra . 
(iuntawang .. 

M udgee . 

Jngiong . 


Pntersoni .. 
vcratrifolinm 


Bilagan bil Hills 
(very local) 


Cunningham Plains 
Mahogany Creek ... 


Hunter's Hill .. 
Round Swamp .. 
Cunningham l’la 


Dordannp . 

Mount Lofty. 

Hasson’s Walls... 
Mount Wilson ... 
Mount Victoria... 


Swan River . 

Champion Buy . 

Mount Lofty Range 

Hunter's Hill. 

Cunningham Plains 


Cudgon . 


Hobart. 

Sydney. 

Cootamundra .. 
(!untawang ... 

Liverpool. 

Parramatta .... 
To S. A. boun¬ 
dary 

Albury. 

Mulong. 

Boorowa . 

G untawang ... 


Time of Dowering. 


Localities roeonlcd in the Flora A uttraliennr. 


Dr. Woolls . 

Topper (Mueller) 
Professor R. Tate 
Fitzgerald . 


Fitzgerald . August . Tasmania, J. D. Hooker. I 

Dr. w’ooiis 
Fitzgerald . 


Cootamundra .. 

Boorowa . 

Mumunbnrrali 
York. 


Sydney... 


Murrumburrah 

(■untawang . 

Molong. 

Boorowa . 

Bunbury . 

Adelaide . 

Bowenfels . 

Blue Mountains 


Bowral.. 

M udgee 
Boorowa 
Warrah.. 
Guntawang 


W.A. 

S.A. 

N.S.W. 


» • itllU . It 

Perth. W.A. 

Gcarldton. 

Adelaide . 1 S.A. 

Sydney . N.S.W 

Murrumburrah „ 
Bowral . 


Bell . 

Dr. Woolls . 
Fitzgerald . 


Mueller. 

Fitzgerald 


Canon King.. 
Fitzgerald 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

C. Jenkins . 

Fitzgerald . 


F. J. Paterson... 


Illuo Mountains 


Fitzgerald . 

A. (T. Hamilton. 

Dr. Woolls . 

G. Sheaffe . 

C. Jenkins . 

F. J. Paterson. 

Fitzgorald . 


A. G. Hamilton. 

Canon King. 

Dr. Woolls . 

Nancarrow (Mueller). 


Wood . 10 Oetobor . 

Dr. Ross . 20 

G. Sheaffe . 30 

A. G. Hamilton ... 


Fob. and March 
April 

23 February 
20 April 

Juno to Sept. 
27 June 

December ... 


October ... 
November 
October 


Oct. to Nov. 

9 (Ictolier 
September 

25 October 
23 August 
25 September 
1 Octolier 


1 October . 

Sept, to Octolier 

28 September 
9 Octolier 
3 November I 


Wiudeo River, Robertson ; Seder’s I 
Cove, Mueller ; Portarlington, Robertson 


Queensland, Brisbane River, MueUer : Rock- 1 
iugham Bay, Dallachy ; Mount Wheeler, 
Thozet 


Net '• South Wales, Hastings and Clarence 
Rivers, Beeklor: Hunter River, Leich¬ 
hardt ; lllawarra, Shepherd 


AV<r South Wales, Richmond River, Homier- I 
son ; New England, C. Stuart; Twofold 
Bay, Mueller, Queensland, Keppel and 
Sh oid water Bays, R. Brown; Brisbane to 
Wide Bay, Leichhardt and Mueller: 
Rockhampton, O’Shanesy; Ncrkool Crook, 
Bowman ; Darling Downs, Law ; Mount 
Elliott, Fitzolan. Victoria, Glenelg to 
(iippsland, Mueller ami Bolicrtson. South 
A ustralia, Glenelg to St. Vincent’s Gulf, 
Muoller; Kangaroo Islaml, Waterhouse. 
Tasmania generally, J. 1), Hooker 

New South Wain, Bathurst, A. Cunningham ; I 
Victoria, Ballarat, G lend inning, Malden, 
Mrs. Nott. Tasmania, Circular Head, 
Gunn ; Tasman River, Archer ; Fliuder 
Island, Milligan 

New South 11'<i/< <, New England, C. Stuart; 
Twofold Bay, Mueller. I'lctoria, north of 
Womboyuo River. 


D. H. Campbell . 
Fitzgerald 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

Dr. Boss . 

G. Sheaffe. 

Fitzgorald. 


G. Sheaffe . 

Dr. Woolls . 

G. Sheaffe. 

E. Merewethor .. 
A. G. Hamilton .. 
Fitzgorald . 


Prof. R. Tate. 

Fitzgerald . 

D. 11. Campbell .. 

G. Sheaffe . 

Fitzgerald . 


Fitzgerald 
G. Sheaffe 
Fitzgerald 


23 August ... 
20 September 


Oetobor ... 
24 August 
2 October 
Sept, to Nov. 

November 
3 October 
September 
24 ()ctober 
October ... 


1 September 
(i October 
August ... 
10 September 
15 September 
Aujj. to Sept. 

August 

September 

15 

25 October 
August ... 
25 October 

25 August ... 
20 Octolier 
January ... 
December 

20 


New South Wales, Albury, Beattie. Victoria. 1 
Portland, Allitt; Port Phillip, Gunn and, 
Adamson ; Maugatta Range and Genoa 
River, Mueller; Ararat, Green; Burra 
Burra, Hinterackcr. Tasmania generally, 

J. 1). Hooker; Port Dalrymple, R. Brown ; 
Flinders Island, Milligan; South Austra¬ 
lia, the Murray to St. Vincent’s Gulf, 
Mueller; York Peninsula, Fowler; Bis¬ 
cuit Flat, Schulzen 


Tasmania, Port Dalrymple, Paterson and R. 
Brown ; George Town, Archer; Southport, 
('. Stuart. Western A ustralia, ltivoli Bay, 
Mueller, 


Victoria, Port Phillij 
Dalrymple, R. 11 
Stuart. 

Tasmania, Port Dalrymple, Paterson 


; Tasmania, Port 
South Port, C. 












































































































































































































































SYNOPSIS OF DISTRIBUTION— continued. 


Localities recorded In the Flora A uSlraliensU. 


ill 


Richmond River , 
Hastings River... 

Hunter's Hill. 

Mount Wilson . 
Katooinha . 

Woodford . 


Biraganbil (very 


Biragaubil (rare) .. 


CV-laiidria ... 
Corysauthes 


Cryptostylis 


Cyrtostylis... 


Dipodium 


ungtiiculata 
erocta. 


leptochila. 


canalicu- 

latum 

cncumer- 

inum 


falcorostris 

monophyl- 

luin 


Moorei . 

phnlicnojisis 
rigiduni. 


sequalis . 


Bulli Pass . 

Pittwater . 

Stone-quarry Creek 


Bent's Basin . 

Hunter's Hill.. .. 

Bald Hill . 

Woodford . 

Hunter’s Hill. 

Red bank Creek.. 
Pittwater . 

Hunter’s Hill .. 

Hungry Hill. 

Lane Cove . 

Long Bay . 

Hunter’s Hill .. 
Mount Wilson .. 

Mount Tomah ... 
Mount Wilson .. 

Hunter’s Hill .. . 
Red bank Creek.. 

Mount Melville.. 
St. Werburghs .. 
Fresh-water Bay 

Mount Lofty... . 
Macleay River .. 

Cudgen . 

Wallis Creek... 

Cedar Creek . 

The Basin . 

Mount Wilson .. 


Clybucca Creek.... 
Hastings River.... 

Camden Park .... 
Stonquarry Creek 
Browulow Hill .... 

Mount BandaBundn 

Cudgen . 

Richmond River . 


Hunter's Ilill 
Mount Wilson 

Mount Lofty.. 


Ballina. 

Port Macquarie 

Conjoin. 

Kurrnjong . 

Sydney. 

Blue Mountains 


Parramatta. 

Kurrajoug . 

Lithgow . 

Chi Item . 

Sydney. 

Lithgow . 

Guntawang. 


Sydney .. 

Blue Mountains 
Lithgow 


Boorowa ... 

Nowra . 

< iuntawang 

Hobart. 

Conilamine River 

Sydney . 

Blue Mountains 
Newcastle... 
Kurrajoug 
Liverpool ... 


Bowral . 

Guntawang. 

Howe’s Island... 
Mneleay River 

Illawarra . 

Broken Bay 

Picton . 

Bowral . 

Mount Drome¬ 
dary 

Nepean River 

Towooinba . 

Possession laid. 
Torres Straits .. 

Cairns . 

Sydney . 

Kurrajong . 

Richmond River 
Blue Mountains 

Parramatta . 

Sydney. 

Picton . 

Broken Bay. 


Sydney... 
Moruya... 
Stroml ... 
Sydney... 


Blue Mountains 

Newcastle . 

Blue Mountains 


Mittagong . 

Moruya. 

Sydney. 

Pictou . 

Guntawang. 

Albany. 

Hay River . 

Perth . 

Freemantle . 

Adelaide . 

Kempsey . 

Tweed River ... 
M‘Lean River... 
Lake Macquarie 

Picton . 

Pitt Water . 

Blue Mountains 
Mount Drome¬ 
dary 

Parramatta. 

Towooinba . 

Trinity Bay. 

Macleay River... 
Bellinger River 
Port Macquarie 
Rock iugham Bay 

Camden . 

Picton . 

Camden . 

Towooinba . 

Macleay River.. 
Tweed River .. 
Ballina. 


Howes Island ... 

Cairns . 

Rockingham Bay 

Daintree River 

Sydney . 

Macleay River... 
Blue Mountains 
Richmond. 


Parramatta . 
Adelaide — 
Guntawang . 


Liverpool .... 
Merimbula . 


Fitzgerald 


November 
December 
5 January 


G. ShenfTe. 

Dr. Woolls . 

Fitzgerald . Oct. and Nov. .. 

.. . 22 December 


Dr. Woolls . 


Wilkinson . 17 Deceinfier 

Kustace (Mueller) . 

Fitzgerald . Novemlier . 

Wilkinson . 17 Deceinlier 

A. G. Hamilton . Novemlier 


Fitzgerald 


A. G. Hamilton ... 

F. .1. Paterson. 

C. Hartmann (Mueller) 
Fitzgerald . 


E. Mercwcther . 

Fitzgerald . 

Canon King. 


October 


1 September 
September 
2<i November 


G. Shoaffe . 

A. G. Hamilton .. 
Fitzgerald . 


2!> August 
5 September . 

September 
4 October 


September 
December 
November . 

,, .. Decemlier 

. 20 November 

,, 2 December 

G. Shcafle . 10 „ 

Miss M. Bate (Mueller) 


Dr. Woolls . 

C. Hartmann (Mueller) 
Captain Broomfield 
Sir W. Maeartliur . 

W. Hill (Mueller) . 
Fitzgerald . 


Fitzgerald 


S. A. Fox. 

Fitzgerald . 

Bell . 

R. W. Thompson . 
Fitzgerald . 


E. Mere wether . 

Fitzgerald . 


G. ShealFe . 

Fitzgerald . 

A. G. Hamilton .. 
Fitzgerald . 


Miss M. Bate (Mueller) 

Dr. Woolls . 

C. Hartmann (Mueller) 

W. Hill (Mueller) . 

Fitzgerald .. 


Comm . . 

Fitzgerald . 

Dr. Woolls 
C. Hartmann (Mueller) 
Fitzgerald . 


Captain Broomticld 
F. Bailey (Mueller) 


W. Hill (Mueller) . 
Fitzgerald . 

E. Mcrewether .... 
Dr. Woolls (after a 
drought) 

Dr. Woolls 

Drilfild. 

A. <!. Hamilton. 


1 ) May 
3 ,, 

June 

July 

Jnue 

8 September 

Juno . 

27 June 
30 September 

July. 

20 July 

December . 
10 Decemlier 
14 November 
20 December ... 
10 

2 January 

1 December 

July. 

10 July 
September 
13 July to 20 Sep. 
September 

August 
Octolier 
September ... 

2 October 
September 


April to Aug. 
January . 


Deccmlier . 
November 
11 January 
28 May 


Novemlier . 
September 


New South Wales, Now England, C. Stuart; I 
Queensland, Moreton Bay, Mueller; F«’c- 
loriit. Mount Sturgeon, Mount Abrupt and 
Latohc River, Mueller ; Mount William, 
Sullivan ; Gippsland, Walter. Tasmania, 
Rocky Cape, Gunn; Cheshunt, Archer; 
Southport, C. Stuart; South Huon, Old¬ 
field ; N. W. Bay, Milligan. 

Tasmania, Hobart, Gunn. I 


Tasmania, Rocky Cape and Woolnorth, I 
Gunn ; Port Scroll, Archer ; Huon River, 
Oldfield ; Oyster Cove, Milligan ; South 
Port, C. Stuart. Queensland, Shoalwater 
Bay, R. Brown 


New South Wales, Hunter River, R. Brown I 4 6 


New South U’uhs, Springwood, R. Cunning¬ 
ham ; Kurrajoug, Mrs. Calvert. 


Netr South Wales, Twofold Bay, Mueller. 
Tasmania (generally), J. D. Hooker. Vie- 
taria, Wendu Vale, Robertson ; Portland, 
Allitt; Station Peak, Mueller. South 
A nstralia, Encounter Bay, Mueller. West¬ 
ern Australia, Vain River, Oldfield 
Rottcncst Island, Prciss. 

1Vor South Wahs, New England, C. Stuart. 
Hastings River, Bockler ; Richmond River, 
Henderson ; Queensland, Brisliane River, 
Bailey. 


New South Wales, New England, C. Stuart. 


Itiver, Banks and 


New Soulh Wales , Clarence itiver, Bockler. 
Queensland, Brisbane River, A. Cunning¬ 
ham and W. Hill; Glasshouse Mountain. 
Bryerlcy 


New South Wales, Hastings and Clarence, 
Heckler; New England, C. Stuart, Armi- 
dale, 1’errott. Queensland, Brisbane River. 
Mueller ; Condamine River, Leichhardt: 
Rockhampton, O’Shanesy; Bimlekin River 
anil Mount Elliott, Fitzalan. Victoria. 
Upper Yarra and Dandenong Range, 
Mueller; Glenclg River, Robertson. Tas¬ 
mania, Circular Hoad, Gunn : Port Sorell 
and Cheshunt, Arclier 
New South Wales, Riehlauds, M ‘Arthur 


New South Wales, Hastings and Clarence 
Rivers, Bcckler; New England, C. Stuart; 
Queensland, Brisbane River, Hill and 
Bailey ; Wide Bay, Leichhardt 


Queensland, Rockingham Bay, Dalloshy . 1 


Queensland, Brisbane River, Hill; Rockhamp- 1 
ton, Tliozct 


1 3 <J 

I 3 0 

I 

























































































































































































































































































SYNOPSIS OF DISTRIBUTION— continued. 


Localities recorded in the Flora A ustraliensi*. 


ill 


Cunninglmtn Plains 

Hunter’s Hilt . 

Newport . ... 

Cunningham Plains 


pedunuulata 


sceumliflora 

cassythoidea 


Woe Wo. .. 

Cunningham Plains 


Seedy Crock_ 


Hunters Hill 
Hastings River 


cllipticus ... 


nigricans ... 
striatum ... 


Reedy Crock... 
Cunningham Plains 
Mount Lofty.... 

Hunter’s Hill . 
Mount Lofty.. . 

Sailor’s l’.ay .... 
Mount Victoria 

Katoomha . 

Woodford . 

Hunter’s Hill.. . 

Swan River .... 

Dardonup . 

Marblcup . 

Mount Lofty... 
Hunter’s Hill . 


Boaudescrt Hills 
(rare) 


Five Dock . 

Muunt Wilson . 


Hunter's Hill 
Mount Wilson 
Suringtvood ... 
Hunter’s Hill . 
Wentworth .. 
Mount Wilson 

Hunter’s Hill 
Goonawatta ... 


Hen and Chicken 
Bay. 


Murrnmlnirruh 

Ciuntawang. 

Sydney. 

Pittwater . 

M urrumburrah 

Alhury. 

Bowral. 

Vans . . 

llarny Downs 
Creek 

Ciuntawang . 

Parramatta. 

Sydney . 

Bowenfols. 

Cootamundra ... 

Kethungra . 

Blue Mountains 

Ciuntawang. 

Eppv 

Newcastle . 

dugiong. 

Yass. 

Parramatta . 

Hobart. 

Liverpool. 

Colombo River 
Mnnumhurrah 

Boorowa . 

dugiong . 

i luntawang. 

Yass. 

Macleay River... 
Muirmubidirce 
River 

Sydney. 

Port Macquarie 

Liverpool. 

Paterson River 
Source ofMarana 
River 

Sydney. 

Blue Mountains 

Bethungra . 

Brugong . 

Cootamundra ... 

Ciiutawaiig. 

Merimbula . 

dugiong . 

Bowral. 

M urrumburrah 

Yass. 

Adelaide . 

Hobart. 

Sydney. 

Adelaide .. 

Sydney. 

Blue Mountains 

Sydney- 

Albury. 

Mahogany Creek 
Perth . 

Bunbury . 

Wilson’s Iidot... 

Adelaide . 

Sydney. 

Lithgow . 

Boorowa . 

Newcastle . 

Ciuntawang . 

Parramatta. 

Sydney. 

Blue Mountains 

Lithgow . 

Moruya. 

Parramatta . 

Sydney. 

Bowenfols.. 

Blue Mountains 

Parramatta . 

Blue Mountains 


Sydney . 

Blue Mountains 

Sydney. 

Blue Mountains 

Kiama . 

Sydney. 

Port Hacking ... 

Liverpool. 

Lithgow . 

Sydney . 

Newcastle . 

Cootamundra . 

Hobart. 

Port l’hillip. 

Bowcnfels . 

Sydney. 

Guutawang. 

Liverjiool. 

Parramatta. 

Cirnmpiaus . 


<i. Sheafle 
C. .Jenkins .. 
Drummond ., 


A. O. Hamilton .. 
Dr. Wool Is 
Fitzgerald . 




A. G. Hamilton .. 

Wilkinson . 

K. Merewether .. 

G. Sheaflfc . 

C. Jenkins . 

Dr. Woolls 
F. J. Paterson . 
Fitzgerald.\. 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

C.’. Brown. 

(». Sheafle _ 


T>. H. Campbell .. 

C. Jenkins . 

Fitzgerald . 

F. d. Paterson. 

Fitzgerald . 

ProfT Tate. 


Wilkinson . 

G. Sheafle . 

E. Merewether . 
A. G, Hamilton .. 

Dr. Woolls . 

Fitzgerald . 


Wilkinson . 
G. Sheafle 
Dr. Woolls 
Fitzgerald 


Dr. Woolls 

Fitzgerald . 

E. Merewether , 


2 October .. 

.September 


Sept, to Deer. 
September ... 

23 August 
1 October 
3 November 
Sept, and Oct. 
fi November 
29 August 
28 September 
9 October 


Fitzgeruld 


Canon King. 

K. W. Thompson .... 
C. Barber (Mueller) . 


October .... 
21 September 
2 October 
29 Septemlicr 


Octolier 
November 
Octol>or 
30 September 


28 September 
1 October 
Aug. to Oct. 

27 September 

28 September 
6 October 

15 Septemlier 
9 October 
24 October 

July and Aug. 


December 
Novomber 
Decern her 
November 
August .... 
September 


Septemlier 

24 October 
September . 
27 October 
80 .. 

29 August 
Sept, to Oct. 


December . 
25 October 
8 January 
1 December 


A | uil 
14 March 

1 Jecember 
II January 


Fitzgerald . 

G. Skcaflu . 

Fitzgerald . 

Canon King. 

Wilkinson .. 

Fitzgerald . 

E. Merewether ... 

Fitzgerald . 

F. J. l’atcrmm. 

Mueller. 

Fitzgerald ... . 

A. G. Hamilton ... 
Canon King 
Dr. Woolls 
Sullivan (Mueller) 


April 


i4 

7 April 

M ay. 

April 
2 March 
10 March 

29 August 
1 October . 
3 November 


July. 

June to Sept. 


AVir South Wales, Clarence River, Wilcox i 
Ranges, M‘Arthur; Mtldgcc, Dr. Woolls; 
Murrumhidgee, Nolan. Victoria, Port 
Phillip, Gunn and Mueller; Wendu Vale,: 
Robertson; Yarra, Mount Alexander, 
Mount Abrupt, Mueller; Gippaland, 
Walter 


.Vu/• South With*, New England, C. Stuart ; 1 
Twofold Bay, Mueller. Victoria, Wendu 
Vale, Robertson ; Port Philliji. rtttnn: 
Forest Creek, Sealer's Cove, M uoller ; 

(irampians, Fisher. Tasmania (generally), 

J. I>. Hooker. South A net nil in. Bugle, 
Barossa and Lofty Ranges, Mueller ; York 
Peninsula, Fowler 


New South Wales, Macquarie River and Vale 1 
of Clyde, A. Cunningham. Victoria, 
Wendu Vale, Robertson: Portland and 
Melbourne, Mueller; Gippsland, Walter ; 


New South With*, Now England, ('. Stuart; 
(Juccnslaiul, Moretou Island, Mueller. 


New South Wale*, N. W. Interior, Fraser; 
New England, (Stuart ; Twofold Bay, 
Mueller; ITcton'd, Glenelg River, Robert¬ 
son : Portland, Allitt ; Port Phillip. 
Mueller; Ballarat, Glendinning. Tas- 
mania (generally), J. D. Hooker ; South 
Australia, Bugle Ranges, Mueller; " 
counter Bay, Whittaker. 


New South Wah*, New England, C’. Stuart; 
Twofold Bay, Mueller. Victoria, Genoa 
River, Mueller. (Queensland, Moretou Bay, 
Leichhardt. 


Victoria, between Mcdlsjurue and Brighton, 
Mueller ; Genoa Creek, Waller. Tux- 
mania, George Town, Archer; Rocky 
Capo Milligan. Wextern Australia, Es 

S ice Bay and Cape LcGi-and, Maxwell; 
ng Range, I'rciss 


New South Walt*, Now England, C. Stuart ; 
Victoria, East Gippsland, Walter; Tas¬ 
mania, Dentrccastruaux Channel, Milligan 


New South Wahs, lllawarra, A. Cunningham. 
Virtoria, Damleuong, Mueller; <deuelg 
Valley, Robertson. South Australia, St. 
Vincent's Gulf, Mueller and Behr ; Spen¬ 
cer’s Gulf, Wiihehui. 


Xrir South Wale*, Bcrrima, Mrs. Calvert; 1 
Durval, Leichhardt; New' England, C. 
Stuart. Tasmania, Cheshunt, Arclier ; 
Oyster Cove, Milligan ; Huon River, Old- 
lield ; Southport, C. Stuart. South Aus¬ 
tralia, Port Lincoln, R. Brown. 

South Australia, Port Lincoln, R. Brown. J 
Tasmania, Oyster Cove, Milligan ; South- 
port, C. Stuart. 


Victoria, Wen dee Vale. Rolicrtson. Tas¬ 
mania generally, J. 1>. Hooker. South 
A uslraliu, Mount Lofty, Mueller. I Fester» 
Australia, Swan River. Dnumnoin 
Albany, Muir ; Mount Baker, Mueller. 


Victoria, towards Brighton, Mueller.. 




















































































































































































































































viii 


SYNOPSIS OF DISTRIBUTION— continued. 


Time of flowering. 


Localities recorded In the Flora Austealleniis. 


t ill 


eycnoccp- 


hispidula , 
longi folia . 


ophioglossa 
parviflora ... 


striata .... 
squamata . 


Fitzgeralili 
Hillii. 


Hunter’s Hill ... 
Mount Wilson ... 
Woodford . 


Dcniliqtiiii Station 
Cunningham Plains 


Berry’s Bay ... 
Core's Creek ... 
Hunter’s Hill... 
Springwood ... 
Mount Wilson 
Ham Common 
Hunter’s Hill 
Stone.qnarry Creek 

Mount Wilson . 

Bulli Pass . 

Ham Common .... 
Biraganbil Hills* .. 


Newcastle . 

llowral. 

Liverpool . 

Dcniliquin . 

Murrumburrah 

Boorowa . 

Guntawang. 

.Sydney. 


reflexa 

Var. A 
" •. B 


Cudgin 


Blue Mountains 


Richmond . 

.Sydney. 

Cl. toll 

Blue Mountains 
Illnwarra ... 


Hunter’s Hill . 

Cunningham Plains 


Reedy Creek .. 
Hunter's Hill 

Bulli . 

Newport. 

Mount Wilson 


Hunter’s Hill ... 
Mount Wilson .... 
Redbank Creek... 

Newport. 

(lihhen . 

Ham Common .... 
Hunter’s Hill .... 

Bald Head. 

Ixmg Bay . 

“ The Points" _ 

Hassan Walls . 

Mount Wilson . 

l.ong Bay . 

Hunter’s* Hill 

Mount Wilson . 

Hunter's Hill .... 
Mount Wilson ... 
Bushranger's Cave 

Biraganbil. 

Beaudcsert Hills . 


Freshwater Bay 

Mount Lofty. 

Hunter's Hill .. 

Reedy Creek . 

Round Swamp .. 
Beaudcsert Hills 
Ham Common .. 
Beaudcsert Hills 


Newcastle . 

Richmond .... 

Moray a. 

Guntawang . 

Liverpool. 

Parramatta . 

Cootamundra .. 

Guntawang. 

Rockhampton .. 

Sydney. . 

M urrain hurrah 

Liverpool. 

(iuntawaug. 

Lithgow . 

Warrah. 


J among ... 

Sydney . 

Illnwarra . 

Pittwater . 

Blue Mountains 

Newcastle . 

Bowral . 


Sydney. 

Bluo Mountains 
Picton 


Pittwater. 

Port Hacking 
Richmond ... 

Sydney. 

Richmond River 


Bowenfcls. 

Blue Mountains 
Bowral. 


Sydney.. 


Pittwater......... 

Blue Mountains 

Newcastle . 

Bowral .. 

Sydney . 

Blue Mountains 

Picton . 

Guntawang. 


Naroo Falls . 

Mount Warning .. 
Stone-onarry Creek 
Bell Biial Creek 


Mount Banda Banda 
Mount Wilson 
Mount Tomah 

Taylor’s Ann... 
Bulli Pass . 


Moruya. 

Freemantle . 

Perth . 

Adelaide . 

Sydney. 

Guntawang. 

Boorowa . 

Lithgow . 

Jugiong. 

Yass. 

Urana . 

Cootamundra ... 

Guntawang . 

Mittagong . 

Richmond . 

Molong. 

Guntawaug. 

Boorowa . 

Gulgong . 

Tweed River ... 


Macleay River.. 
Bellinger River 
Brisbane River 
Macleay River 

Kiama . 

Wollongong. 

Port Macquarie 
Mount Drome¬ 
dary 

Bellinger River 
Tweed River ... 

Picton . 

Nepean River ... 


Bellinger River 
Nambticca 
River 

Hlawarra. 


A. G. Hamilton .. 
c. Brown 
K. Mcrewether . 
< I. Sh< affa . 
Canon King 
Fitzgerald . 

G. Sheaffo """" 
A. G. Hamilton .. 

K. Dantrey . 

Fitzgerald . 


August . 

25 October 

5 Soptcmlwr 
July to Oct. 

27 September 
29 August 

6 1 >• i" 1 " r 


Aug. to Oct. 
May. 


Dr. Woolls . 
Fitzgerald . 


G. Sheaffo . 

K. Mcrewether . 

Dr. Woolls . 

Bell . 

A. G. Hamilton . 

Canon King 
Dr. Woolls 

Fitzgerald . 

A. G. Hamilton . 

Dr. Woolls 

Fitzgerald . . . 


April 

14 March 

15 May 
August . .. 
September 

25 October 
5 Septendier 
4 October 
29 August 
15 May 
27 June 

June to Aug. 


23 August . 

Sept, to Nov. 


October . 


. September 

A. G. Hamilton . Aug. to Sep. 

Wilkinson . 21 November 

E. Mcrewether . 15 September 

G. Sheaffe. 28 

Fitzgerald . June... 


Dr. Woolls . 
Fitzgerald . 


March . 

23 February 
30 March 

April 

March . 

March . 
April 
March 
14 March 
April 


E. Merewetlier . 
G . Sheafle 
Fitzgerald . 


September ... 


25 October 
29 August 
0 October 
March ... 

14 March 

. April 

A. G. Hamilton. April to June 


Bell . 

Fitzgerald 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

G. Sheaffe . 

Wilkinson . 

G. Sheaffo . 

S. A. Fox. 

Fitzgerald . 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

E. Daintrey. 

Dr. Woolls . 


A. G. Hamilton .. 

G. Sheaffo . 

Wilkinson . 

J. Guilfoyle. 


Fitzgerald . 

F. M.’Bailey "(MueUer) 
Fitzgerald . 


O. Reader (Mueller) 


Fitzgerald ... 
J. Guilfoyle... 
Fitzgerald ... 


27 June 

August 
September 
November ... 
Sept to Nov, 
30 October 
17 November 

28 September 
May 

1 November ... 
November 
Sept to Nov. 


Oct. to Nov. 
23 November 
10 November 
October . 


5 September 


New South Wole.*, Twofold Bay, Mueller. 
Victoria, Wcndn Vale, Roljertson ; Mcl- 
lioumc, Adamson; Darabin Creek and 
Mount Disappointment, Mueller. Jus- 
mania generally, J. D. Hooker ; Port Dal- 
ryiuple, R. Brown. South Australia , 
Barossa, Lofty, and Bugle Ranges, 
MueUer. 


Victoria, Forest Creek, Mount Disappoint¬ 
ment, Wilson’s Promontory, and Nan- 
gatta Range, MueUer; Grampian Hills, 
r'isher ; Gippsland, Walter. Tasmania 
generally,.!. I>. Hooker. Smith Australia, 
Mount Lofty Range, Mueller. 


Victoria, Mount Kennedy, on the Maranoa. I 
Sir T. MitchelL 


Victoria, Portland Bay, Mueller; E. Gipjw- 
laml, Walter. Queensland, Brisbane River, 
MorotonBay, Bailey. 7’<MOi««ki generally, 
J . D. Hooker ; Port Dalrymplc, 1’aterson. 
South A ustmlia, Mount Gambier, Mueller 
(some of the al>ove may refer rather to P. 


the north generally,.!. D. Hooker; South- 
l>ort, C. Stuart. 


Queensland, Port Curtis, R. Brown; Brisbane 
River, Mueller. 

New South ITo/rs, Aitken Creek. A. Cunning¬ 
ham. Queensland, Brisbane River and 
Morcton Island, MueUer. Victoria, Wil¬ 
son’s Promontory, MueUer. Tasmania, 
Port Dalryrnple, R. Brown ; Huon River, 
Oldfield ; Ho Dart, J. D. Hooker; Ches- 
hunt, Archer. 

New South ll'a/r,, i Irosc River, Miss Atkinson. 
Tasmania generally, J, D. Hooker; Port 
Dalrymplu, It. Brown. 


New South Wedes, New England, ('.Stuart; 1 
Mudgee, Taylor. Victoria, Grampians 
and Wimmorn. MueUer; Little River, 
Fullagar; East Gippslaml, Walter. Wes¬ 
ton A astralia, \ asse River, Oldfield ; 
Hampden, Clarke; Grenough Flats, C. 
Gray. 


New South Wales, Clarence River, Beckler, 
Queensland, Brisbane River, Mueller and 
BaUey. 


2>'ie South lli il>s, Hunter, Paterson, and 
WiUiains Rivera, R. Brown. 


A - a- South Wales, Camden River, and Parra- I 
matta, Dr. Woolls; I lastings and Clarence 
Rivera, Beckler. Queens!,,nd, Brisbane 
River, W. Hill ; Rockhampton, Thozet 
and O’Shanesy. 


New South Wales, Hastings and Clareuee I 
Rivera,Beckler. Queensland, Rockingham 
Bay, Dallashy; Morcton Bay, W. Hill 


iVitli smooth UbcIluiiL 































































































































































































































































































SYNOPSIS OF DISTRIBUTION— continued. 


parviflorus 


Spathoglottis Pauli mu .. 
Spiranthes... Australia.. 


mcgcalyptr 


paueillora.. 


Yarraba.. 

Redbank Creek.. 
Hunter's Hill .. 

Now Port . 

MouutTomah .. 
Fern-tree Gully 

Hunter’s Hill . 


Hunter’s Hill .... 

New Port . 

Mount Wilson ... 

Mount Tomali .... 
Hunter’s Hill ... 


Mount Lofty. 

Hunter’s Hill . 

Doniliquin Station 


, Hunter’s Hill.. 


Marbleup . 

St. Werburgh . 

The Bows . 

Mount Lofty... 
Hunter’s Hill . 
Mount Wilson . 
Mount Lofty 


Macleay River 
Mount Drome¬ 
dary 

Pieton . 

PiU Water'. 
Blue Mountains 

Melbourne . 

Cape Sidmoltb 
Cape Granville 

Sydney. 

Bellinger River 
Lake George .. 
Macleay River.. 

Bowenfcls . 

Alps . 


Q. 

N.S.’W. 


Coudamine River 

Sydney. 

Liverpool. 

Pitt Water . 

Blue Mountains 

Parramatta . 

Blue Mountains 

Sydney. HB 

Bethungra 
Lithgow ... 
Guntawang 
Adelaide ... 


Sydney.. 


Peniliquin .. 
Guntawang .. 
Boorowa . 


Sydney 
Albany 
Wilson’s Inlet... 
Hay River ... 
Northampton 

Adelaide . 

Sydney. 

Blue Mi 
Adelaide 
Albany 


N.S.W. 
and V. 

Q. 

N.S.W. 


Fitzgerald . 

Miss M. Bate (Mueller) 


Dr. Curdio (Mueller)... 

Ready (Mueller). 

Fitzgerald . 


C. Hartmann (Mueller) 
Fitzgerald . 


Dr. Woolls . 
Fitzgerald . 


Wilkinson . 

A. G. Hamilton .. 
Fitzgerald . 


(T. ixioides of Hooker) 

Fitzgerald .. 

A. G. Hamilton .. 

G. Sheafle. 

C. Jenkins . 

Fitzgerald . 


25 October 

December ... 
September ... 
1 October 
6 November 
Sept. & Oct. 

24 October 

October 

25 September ... 
Sept, to Oct. 

30 October 
9 October 
September .. 

20 

30 

8 October 
25 August 

24 October 

23 September .. 

25 October 

24 „ 

20 September 


Localities recorded in the Flora Austraticnsi». 


_ w .__ , Tasmania, Emu Bay, 

liver. Circular Head, Great Swan- 
port, Gunn and Milligan. 

Queensland, Rockingham Bay, Dallashy . 


New South Wales, Blue Mountains, Miss 
Atkinson; New England, C. Stuart - 
Clarence River, Beckler; Richmond River. 
Fawcett. Victoria, Mitta Mitta, Broad- 
ribb, and Snowy Rivers, Lake Otnco, 
Mueller ; Portland, Crouch. Tasmania, 
Circular Head, Gunn ; Cheshunt, Archer 
Swanport, Story. 

Victoria, Wendu Vale, Robertson, Port 
Pliillip, C. French. Tasmania, Hobart, 
Gunn j Georgetown, and Cheshunt, 
Archer; Southport, C. Stuart. 

New South ii'(i/r.<, iilawarra, Backhouse 
Victoria, Forest Creek, Mount Disappoint¬ 
ment, Wilson's Promontory, Nangatta 
Range, Mueller; Grampians, Fisher; E. 
Gippsland, Walter. Tasmania (generally), 
J. D. Hooker. 





























































































































































I'rom Nature and on Stone try RDPiugerald FLS 




Car ue a 


Caladeni A 


Printed, at the Surveyor Generals Office Sydney N SW 
November 1 S 80 . 


Alba 







Caladenia alba. ( 11 . Broun.) Calaclenia carnea. Broun.) 


These plants afford a good illustration of a question that lias often suggested itself to me in the examination of 
orchids, and one equally applicable to other orders,—whether there are not varieties or species (hardly recognized even 
as varieties) that arc in reality as distinct from each other as the most unquestioned species; but from their 
departure from each other being of a constitutional character (not to be marked by a bract or a gland) are over¬ 
looked or disregarded. In support of this suggestion of innate distinctness , I may here give the result of a long 
scries of experiments in the hybridization of Hibiscus. No botanist has, I believe, ever thought of including II. 
divaricates, H. heterophyllus, H. splendens , and II. Fitzgerald i , in one species, yet they arc crossed freely and the 
offspring are fertile with the original plants and amongst themselves, with no apparent tendency to sterility or relapse 
to either parent, at least so far as I have been able to test them, that is, to the fifth generation. All attempts, however, 
to cross any of them with U. diversifolius , II. mutabilis , or H. manihot , or the latter amongst themselves, has been 
without success. The reason I believe to be that they have a constitutional characteristic (quite as marked in its way as 
any outward specific distinction) of repugnance to other species, which may possibly lie in the pollen and be consequently 
inappreciable. A further illustration of innate distinction that cannot be found in dried specimens is afforded by the 
hybrids between II. splendens and II. Fitsgeraldi. II. splendens flowers early in the morning; II. Fitzgerald/, in the 
evening ; the hybrids in the middle of the day. Thus marking the force of an externally inappreciable distinction. 
In the case of Caladcnia alba and C. carnea , it would I think be impossible to describe positively the difference between 
them, yet I believe them to be as distinct as many recognized species, and I do not think that I should ever pick the one 
in mistake for the other. The only distinction of a specific character however, that appears to be constant, is that the 
labellum is broader and does not clasp the column to the same extent in C. alba as in C. carnea. There is, however, a 
constitutional difference in their time of flowering, C. alba being always before C. carnea , and the general distinctions 
arc that C. alba is white, though sometimes pink ; that C. carnea is pink, though perhaps sometimes white; that C. alba 
is the larger flower, and that its column is not generally marked or at least barred, though sometimes blotched, and the 
same may be said of the labellum. Such cases as tins deserve more consideration than they generally receive, for who 
can say whether C. alba is a variety or a species ? Yet here, if anywhere, and in the thousands of doubtful species (in 
great part for convenience and to escape the difficulties of determination) called varieties, and to be found in almost 
every genus, rests the fulcrum of the Darwinian theory, and the proof or otherwise of change so often demanded by its 
opponents. 

On one occasion I had the pleasure of seeing Caladenia alba actually fertilized by an insect. A flower was 
observed to tremble, and on examination it was found that a fly had alighted upon its labellum, was by its spring carried 
against the stigma and adhering to it struggled violently to escape, and thereby withdrew the pollen-masses from the 
anther and smeared them over the stigma. This instance, in my opinion, goes far to show that though the pollinia in 
this and many other species may, without fertilizing the flower, be easily removed by touching the disc or discs with the 
point of a pin, the operation is not by any means so neatly performed by an entrapped insect, and the consequence is that 
the flowers are impregnated by their own pollen. 

C. alba flowers in August, and is to be found in shady forests generally, on moderately good soil. 

C. carnea flowers in September, and is often to be procured on barren hill-tops and in the crevices of rocks, as well 
as in open forests. 


EXPLANATION OP PLATE. 

Caladcnia carnea. Pig. 1. Labellum, from the front and back. 2. Column, from back, side, and front. 3. Column 
and labellum, from the side. 4. Pollen-masses, from the edges. 5. Pollen-masses. 

Caladenia alba. Pig. 1. Column, from the front. 2. Column, from the side. 3. Column, from the back. 
4. Labellum, from below. 5. Labellum, from above. 6. Glands of the disc. 7. Glands at the base of the labellum. 
b. Top of column, from the side. 9. Top of column, from the front. 10. Pollen-masses. 11. Column and labellum, 
showing how a fly is impelled against the stigma by the upward spring of the labellum. 




















Genus Coelandria. (Fitzgerald.) 

Tiie genus Dendrohium cannot I think he made to include the plant which I have consequently named Coelandria 
(“ Smillice''). The habit is not altogether that of Dendrohium, the leaves being more numerous and thin, the short 
axillary racemes, on a thick peduncle, are not those of a Dendrohium, and the labcllum and column arc altogether 
distinct. In the true Dendrobiums the labcllum will be always found to be articulate, indicative of a distinct method of 
fertilization. In this proposed genus it is united to the column, forming w ith it a nectary which contains honey (absent 
in all the species of Dendrohium I have examined). The column is not smooth throughout (as in Dendrohium) but deeply 
divided transversely. The stigma is not a chamber, but a shield within a chamber. The labcllum is not shaped like that 
of a Dendrohium and is without the longitudinal raised plaits, but on the contrary has a transverse bar which fits into a 
transverse groove in the column, and the pollen-masses instead of being formed like grains of w heat arc united into a 
thin hollow scale easily resolvable into four narrow' hollow scales, and from this peculiarity I have named the genus. 
Immediately above the stigma and resting upon it, in a depression, is a soft white waxy mass (absent in Dendrohium) 
which may be considered a rostellum, and on this the concave pollinia rest, are removed with at least a portion of it if it 
be touched, or probably leave it, and remain in the anther, if the anther be drawn back from behind. The pollen-masses, 
unlike those of Dendrohium (which are, I believe, invariably white or yellow), are of a bright red-brown. 

I have made a comparison with Dendrohium rather than given a description of Coelandria, as I have no 
opportunity of comparing with C. Smillice any of the other species which I think should probably be included with it. 
Among them are those named D. agrostophyllum , D. viridiroseum, D. mohliamum (Tab. XCI, Flora Vitiensis, page 303), 
from Mr. Darwin’s description, and the representation of the column, &c., given in his “Fertilization of Orchids,” 
page 139, possibly D. chrysanthum and probably others now included in Dendrohium on the collation of which the 
characteristics would necessarily require modification. 





























5\*/ 

T romHalttni c'vR.DhM,* raldF LS. 


CCELANDRIA Smillia' 


On SunebyArOnn-'I 


itmtftj ytth©Surveyor•jf.rwtil's 0;'lcftSydneyM Vv 
Moveml3erl8T0 







Coelandria Similise, (Fitzgerald.) 
(Dendrobimn Smillkc, Mueller .) 


To Sir William M‘Arthur I am indebted for the opportunity of figuring this species, which has flowered in his orchid- 
house. It appeal’s to me to be fertilized by insects in a totally distinct method from Dendrobium, in which as in many other 
genera thelabellum attached by an clastic hinge acts against the weight of an insect and impels it against the stigma. In 
this species the labellum is included within the lower sepals (fig. 10) and adheres to the column, so as with it to form a 
nectary (figs. 11 and 12) in which honey is secreted. In the end of the labellum is a groove (ligs. 1 and 8), and if a 
bristle be pushed down through this groove and gently withdrawn, the soft waxy matter (figs. 5 and 12), which rests on 
the stigma and on which the pollen scales lie, adheres to the bristle and removes the pollen scales, which arc driven back 
upon the stigma by the constant pressure of the labellum or are brought away upon the bristle. In Nature this operation 
is, I should think, performed by the proboscis of some large moth or butterfly when probing to reach the honey at the 
base of the column. Coelandria Smillia ? flowers in November, and is found in North-eastern Australia. 

EXPLANATION OE PLATE. 

Coelandria Smillue. Eig. 1. Labellum, from the side, back, and front. 2. Top of column, from the front, anther 
raised. 3. Pollen-masses. 4. Pollen-masses on rostellum. 5. Stigma, rostellum, and pollen-masses. C. Column, from 
the side. 7. Column, from the front. 8. Back of column and top of labellum. 9. Flower, from the back. 10. Flower, 
from the front. 11. Labellum and column, from the side. 12. Labellum and column, from the side, half of labellum 
and one wing of column removed. 




















Fromhature anion, Stcmehy RDPiugsrold F.LS 


Dendrobioides 


Diuris 


Pedunculata 


Printed al the Surveyor Generals Office Sydney N S.W 

















Diuvis pcdmiculata. (A*. Brown.) Diuris dcndrobioides. (Fitzgerald.) 

Sin,'is pedmculata varies much in liahit, being sometimes very slender and at others robust-thc one belonging apparently 
to the coast, the other to the interior. The flowers of the larger form arc much more open than those of the slender kind, 
and the labcllum much larger in proportion (fig. 3), the central lobe being less rhomboidal; but the pubescence of the 
labellum easily distinguishes it from all other species. D. hccis (which I discovered in Western Australia) is the nearest 
allied, but differs from it specially in the smoothness of the labcllum and the spiral form of the leaves. In one specimen 
of D. pedmculata, found at Deniliquin, the pollen-masses were attached to the back of the stigma close to the rostellum 
(fig. 4), and this plant would thus no doubt have produced seed without the removal of the pollinia, or pollen being 
placed upon the front of the stigma. Tins single instance shows that in some cases Diuris may be self-fertilized by 
contact of the back or edge of the stigma with the pollen of the same flower, and the relationship is established with 
Orthoceras , in which genus fertilization always takes place by contact of the pollen-masses with the back of the stigma, 
close to the rostellum. D. pedmculata is generally but not numerously distributed in New South Wales; it grows in 
stiff clay, and flowers in September and October. 

Diuris dendrobioides may not be considered an established species, as I only found two plants at Cunningham’s 
Plains, near Murrumburrah, and Mr. A. G. Hamilton has obtained what lie considered to be the same plant at Guntawang, 
near Mud gee. The two plants observed by me grew close together in a field, where numbers of D. elongala and D. 
pedmculata were in flower, and they may have originated from a cross between the two species. They had, however, 
some characters very distinct from both, such as the breadth, shortness, and colour of the lower sepals. They are, I think, 
worthy of a figure and a name, whether others are found elsewhere or not. If not, it is very interesting as an example 
of a very distinct form, of which two examides at least have existed, and which, if it could establish itself and become 
numerous, would undoubtedly be considered a species. 

The date of flowering was 2nd of October. 

Description of Drums Dendrobioides. 

Itathcr stout, about ten inches high. Leaves, three or four at the base of the stem, linear-oblong, obtuse, three or 
four inches. Flowers (resembling those of a Dendrobium rather than a Diuris), four or five, dark red-brown, with light 
edges. Petals about eight lines, oblong, undulate, broadly stipitate. Dorsal sepal broad, undulate, embracing the 
column, about five lines long. Lateral sepals petal-like, dark red-brown, broadly lanceolate, acute, about one inch. 
Labellum three-lobed from the base, the lateral lobes broadly cuneate, denticulate at the ends. Central lobe linear at the 
base, but suddenly expanded at half its length ; lower part broadly triangular, with rcvolute edges and a raised line 
along the centre. Two raised plates on the linear part of the labellum bent towards the central raised line, which extends 
to half their length. 'Wings of the column denticulate, shorter than the anther. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATE. 

Diuris pedmculata. Fig. 1. Labcllum, from the front. 2. Labellum, from the side. 3. Labellum (natural size), 
from robust form. 4. Stigma, showing pollen-mass adhering to the left lobe. 5. Column, from the front. 6. Column, 
from the back. 7. Column, from the side, anther drawn back. 

Diuris dendrobioides. Fig. 1. Labellum, from the side. 2. Labellum, from the front. 3. Column, Lorn the back. 
4. Column, from the front. 5. Pollen-masses. 


































Genus Dipodium. (/,*. Brown.) 

Ims genus is intermediate between the epiphytes and terrestrial orchids ; the form of the column, the anther, pollen- 
masses, and labellum, being those of the former—the habit that of the latter. 

It is in Australia a small genus, two only being known, but, as might be expected from its approach to the epiphytes, 
it is also found (according to Bentham) in New Caledonia, Eastern Archipelago, and East Indies, and like the epiphytes 
is dependent on insects for its fertilization. 


Dipodium punctatum. (It. Drown.) 

Tins orchid is known by many local names, such as “native hyacinth,” “spotted lily,” &c., and is frequently to be seen 
in the hands of Christmas holiday-makers, who cannot fail to notice its spike of spotted flowers growing leafless from the 
baked ground, at the foot of some gnarled gum-tree—almost the only flower in that dry season, and all the more remark¬ 
able for the specially barren situation it elects to grow in. Dipodium punctatum is probably a parasite on the roots of 
trees; but it is very difficult to determine absolutely whether tubers such as those of this orchid really derive nourishment 
from or have been nourished by the roots of other plants or trees, or have merely grown in juxtaposition and adapted 
themselves to them as they do to stones in gravelly situations. Among the orchids, respecting which it would be interest¬ 
ing to ascertain whether they arc always or have been at an early stage parasitical, are Gastrodia, Galeola , and Drasophjllum 
flavum , and among other Australian families the W estern Australian Nuylsiu, and A-lkiusonia of hew bouth Wales. 

The light greenish form (fig. B) is from specimens kindly sent to me from Gimtawang, near Mudgee, by my friend 
A. G. Hamilton. It may possibly be D. squamalurn, referred to (in a note) by Bentham in the flora Australionsis, as 
from New Caledonia, and differing from 1). punctatum “ chiefly in the more closely imbricate, appressed, and acute scales, 
at the base of the stem,” but I have never seen a specimen of the New Caledonian plant. 1). punctatum is distributed 
oyer the whole coast country of Australia, with the exception probably of Western Australia, and flowers, as previously 
stated, in December. 

EXPLANATION OE PLATE. 

A. Dipodium punctatum. rig. 1. Seed capsules, part of one removed. 2. Column and part of perianth. 
3. Labellum, from the front, i. Topol column. 5. Top ot column, anther and pollen-masses removed. 6. Pollen-masses. 

B (possibly Dipodium nquamatum). Kg. 1. Column, from the side and front. 2. Labellum, from the front, and 
column, from the hack. 3. Labellum and column, from the side. 













































ftmtfidal lie Surveyor Generate Office Sydney N SW 
December 1HSL 
















Dendrobium plialsenopsis. ( Fitzgerald .) 

Tins beautiful Dendrobium lias been imported by Captain Broomfield, and flowered in his grcen-liouse. It is a splendid 
addition to the charming lilac Dcndrobs procured within the last few years from Northern Australia and New Guinea. 
It is closely allied to D. bigibbum, D. superb lens, and 1). Goldii. It is easily distinguished from D. bigibbnm by the 
absence of the convex form in the flowers—of the cluster of white glands on the disk of the labollum—of the cmarginatc 
termination of the labellum—and the drooping carriage of the flowers; from D. superb tens by the broadness of the 
parts of the perianth, and the sepals not being obtuse or undulate, and the absence of ridges or plates on the labellum, 
which in D. superbiens are similar to those in D. undulatum , which D. superbiens resembles in all but colour. It is also 
by no means so robust a plant as D. superbiens. D. Goldii , of New Guinea, appears from the figure in the “ Garden” 
(Sep. 11,1878, No. 35G)—for I have seen no description—to be unlike it in the form of the labellum, the narrowness of the 
parts of the perianth, the drooping habit of the flowers, length of spikes, form of the leaves, and banded stems. I have 
given this finest of the Australian Dcndrobs the name of phaUcnopsis from the likeness of its flowers to moths and also 
its likeness to the genus Phalamopsis, the flowers having a strong resemblance to those of that genus. It was obtained in 
Northern Queensland, and flowers in April. (The plant from which the description was taken has again flowered, 
producing three hundred flowers.) 

Description (published in the Gardener's Chronicle of 10 July , 1880, Vol. XIV, No. 341). 

Stems about twenty inches, slightly contracted towards the base. Leaves, about eight or ten on the upper eight 
inches of the stem, lanceolate, reaching five inches. Baccmes at least half the length of the stems, terminal on peduncles 
of about ten inches. Blowers, about fifteen, on pedicles of about one inch, lilac, two inches to two and a half across. Sepals, 
lanceolate, acute, one inch long and about five lines broad. Petals obovate, acute, one inch broad. Labellum one inch 
long, acute, with broad wings meeting over the column-base, forming at the hinge a second spur which reaches half an 
inch and is curved and compressed at the sides. No cafli or plates on the labellum, which is only slightly ridged at the 
base. Pollen-masses more concave than is general in the genus. 

EXPLANATION OP PLATE. 

Pig. 1. Plowcr and buds. 2. Pollen-masses. 3. Labellum and column, from the side. 4. Labellum, from above 
and from the point. 5. Column, from the side. G. Labellum, from the front. 































FromlJamre and. ou Slone by KDFi ’jge raid. F L S 



Dendrobium Becklcri 


Printed ai the Surveyor General* Office Syur r . ' : ,V, 
June 1881 















Dendrobium Beckleri. (Mueller.) 


There is some confusion with respect to Dendrobium Beckleri (Mueller), D. Mortii (Mueller), and D. Boicmanii 
(Bentliam), hut as specimens I obtained at the Macleay River, and which are referred to in the Bora Australiensis as D. 
Mortii , were considered by Baron Mueller to be D. Beckleri as named by him, and as they agree with the description of 
that species, I am compelled to differ from the “Flora” in attaching the name of Beckleri to the figure, which is taken 
from the plant collected on the Macleay, and from which the flowers were originally sent to Baron Mueller. A leading 
distinction between this species and D. 3Iorlii (of which I believe D. Boicmanii is but a synonym) is that D. Mortii 
produces its smaller flowers in pairs, the peduncles being two-flowered. D. Beckleri grows occasionally on rocks, but 
more frequently on the topmost branches of “oaks” ( Casuarina tjlauca ) which stand in the beds of creeks, or of the 
densely crowded white-stemmed brush timbers of the “ cedar scrubs” on alluvial flats and river banks. Its long straggling 
branches are often four feet long. Like most of our Dcndrobs its flowers arc sweet-scented, and are produced in 
November. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATE. 

Dendrobium Beckleri. Fig. 1. Labellum, from the back. 2. Labellum, from the front. 3. Column, from the 
front, with part of perianth, (labellum removed). 


















Pterostylis 

BnrbaUt 


Pnraedbi Uie Sur'eycr General* 5 Offirs Sydney N SW 
August 1879. 



















Pterostylis parviflora. (E. Brown.) Pterostylis barbata. (Lindley.) 

Pterostylis parcijlora Las numerous flowers, as in the section in which the labellums are excluded, but in it the labellum 
is included, and is much smaller in proportion to the size of the flowers than is generally the case—as is also the column. 
I believe that there is no real distinction between P. parviflora and P. aphylla. The principal difference between them 
would, according to the descriptions, appear to be that in the latter the flowers turn towards each other, but I think the 
distinction is not constant. The specimen from which the figure was taken grew at Bowenfels, but a smaller and greener 
form (which is I believe P. aphylla) is common on the Blue Mountains. Both arc sometimes without radical leaves, and 
at others an offshoot from the base of the flower-stern produces leaves, and in both the flowers are generally turned 
towards each other, especially in the small green variety. P. parcijlora flowers in March, and grows in swampy or wet 
flats on the mountains. I have found it at one plaee only near Sydney, at Long Bay, near Coogee. 

Pterostylis barbata. This species should have been figured with P. lurfosa of Western Australia rather than with 
P. parcijlora, but when the drawing was made I had little expectation of obtaining that species. P. barbata has lost, or 
never developed, sensitiveness in the labellum, and in what way (if any) it assists in the fertilization of the plant I have 
not been able to discover. It may be that its likeness to an insect is in some way attractive. This is the only Australian 
species of Pterostylis extending into New Zealand, where it is very rare. A solitary plant, which I found on the summit 
of a hill at Cootamundra, is, I believe, the first procured in New South Wales, though it has been obtained in Victoria, 
South Australia, Western Australia, and commonly in Tasmania. It flowers in October. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATE. 

Pterostylis parvijlora . Fig. 1. Column, Lorn the front, 2. Top of column, wings removed. 3. Top of column, 
from the side, one whig removed. 4. Column, from the side. 5. Flower, from the back. 0. 1 lower, from the front. 
7. Labellum, from the side. 8. Flower, tom open, showing proportion of column to perianth. 9. Column and labellum, 
from the side. 10. Pollen-masses. 11. Flower, from the side. 

Pterostylis barbata. Fig. 1. Labellum, from the front, 2. Top of labellum, from the side. 3. Labellum and 
lower sepals, from the side. 4. Stigma and part of column. 5. Column, Lorn the side. 6. Column, from the front, 
7. Column, from the side, one wing removed. 8. Pollen-masses. 


























. rr". Namre bt SHnu^eraldJFL B Ou3ioneby'ArtkurJ8topp& ’ 



Aronaria 


Caladenia 


C oncolor 


BO-tlke ^urvevnr ijune.-tuk Cffive jycji*-- ?1 SW 

' Nov^iaye 








Caladenia arenaria. ( Fitzgerald .) Caladenia concolor. ( Fitzgerald .) 

Caladenia arenaria is the “ spider orchid” of the Edwards, Murnimbidgec, Yanko, and Columho Rivers, where it is to he 
found growing on the sand-hills among the pines (Frencla robusla). It is conspicuous from the large size of the flowers 
and their grey colour. It flowers in September. 

Caladenia concolor I have only obtained from the granite hills near Albury, and it is very remarkable for the 
darkness and uniformity of colour of the flower and stem. The edges of the labellum are much more acutely divided 
than in C. arenaria , and the column much narrower and simpler in form. It flowers in October. 

Description. 

Caladenia arenaria. A rather robust species, about one foot high. Leaf, oblong-linear, hairy, about six inches, 
blowers, one or two, of a light grey colour. Sepals about three inches long, dilated at the base and tapering into a tine 
point. Dorsal sepal erect. Petals similar to sepals but shorter, about two inches. Labellum, without lobes, about nine 
lines long and five broad (on a rather long claw), lanceolate, recurved, the edges for about four-fifths of their length from 
the point crenate, the points being almost clavatc. Calli of the labellum linear, bent forward, in four rows or six rows, 
near the base. Column about seven lines, curved, winged from above the base of the anther to the ovary. The upper 
part of the wings broad and undulate. Two small globular glands at the base of the column. Point of the anther short. 

Caladenia concolor. A rather robust species, hardly one foot high. The flower and stems of a uniform dark prune 
colour. At least generally one-flowered, sepals and petals about two inches, dilated at the base and tapering to a fine 
point. Labellum without lobes, about seven lines long and four broad, lanceolate, recurved, the edges for about four-fifths 
from the point acutely serrate. Calli of the labellum linear, bent forward in four rows, or near the base six rows. Column 
slightly curved, winged from below the anther to the base, narrower and of more uniform breadth than in C. arenaria. 
Two large globular glands at the base of the column. 

EXPLANATION OF PLATE. 

Caladenia arenaria. Fig. 1. Labellum, from the back. 2. Labellum, from the side. 3. Labellum, from the front. 
4. Calli of the labellum. 5. Column, from the side. 6. Column, from the back and front. 7 and 8. Pollen-masses. 
9. Top of column, from the front. 

Caladenia concolor. Fig. 1. Column, from the back. 2. Column, from the front. 3. Labellum, from the back. 
1. Labellum, from the side. 5. Labellum, from the front. 0. Calli of the labellum. 7. Column, from the side. 
























Caladenia filamentosa Acianthus Caudalus 


Rnntfidai the Surveyor Generals Office Sydney N SW 
Cetober 1880. 













Caladcnia filamentosa. (A\ Brown .) Acianthus caudatus. (A*. Brown .) 

1ms Caladcnia is easily distinguished from the other “spider orchids” by its having only two rows of flat-topped calli on 
the labellum, which resemble the soles of stockinged feet. Dr. Woolls sent me specimens from Mud gee, hut I have never 
seen it in New South Wales. In Western Australia it is very common, and has there a peculiarity of growing in clumps 
which does not belong to members of the genus except those of Western Australia, where many of the orchids spring 
from roots chained or strung together. This union of many individuals by a connection of their tubers, or rather this 
production of many united tubers or bulbs from which numerous flower-stems spring, may have originated in the benefit 
such union would afford in preventing desiccation in a country subject to drought. In the case of this species I have 
counted forty-two flower-stems which had their bulbs all united together and entangled in one mass. The habit adds 
much to the beauty of the species which possess it, as the flowers arc brought together in pretty bunches. Caladenia 
filamentosa fhnvers in August. 

Acianthus caudatus is figured with Caladenia filamentosa, in order to show the distinctions between the two closely 
allied genera by contrasting the most similar species. Acianthus caudatus is a rare orchid in the neighbourhood of 
Sydney, and appears to be rarer than it is, from the infrequency of its flowering. It is rather a mountain than a coast 
species, being very common on the Kurrajong and other parts of the Blue Mountains, probably on account of the lower 
temperature, as it is common in Tasmania. It flowers in August, though its congeners flower in the beginning of the 
winter (March and April), and it is to be found when near the coast in damp fissures in rocks, but in the mountains in 
shady forest. 

EXPLANATION OE PLATE. 

Caladenia filamentosa. Pig. 1. Top of column, from the front. 2. Top of column, from the side, two pollen- 
masses removed. 3. Labellum, from the front. 4. Labellum, from the back. 5. Pollen-masses. 0. Column, from the 
side. 7. Column, from the front. 8. Calli of the labellum. 9. Column and labellum, from the side. 

Acianthus caudatus. Eig. 1. Elower, from the side. 2. Top of column, valves of the anther turned back, showing 
pollen-masses. 3. Top of column, from the front and side. 4. Column and labellum, from the front, with part of perianth. 





















Dendrobium Moorei. (Mueller.) 


This pretty Dendrobium, though very like D. Kingianum in habit, differs from all other Australian forms in its long 
nectary or spur and very peculiar petal-like labellum, which, unlike that of other species, is devoid of plates or glands and 
possessed of pointed lobes on the edges. It was named by Baron Mueller, in honor of C. Moore, Director of the Botanical 
Gardens, Sydney, from specimens I procured on the mountains at Howe’s Island, in 1869, where I again obtained it 
in 1877. It does not belong to the low grounds of the island (to which it is peculiar), but clings to the precipices in 
the mountains and the mossy branches of trees which hang over the cliffs. When seen adhering to the black basalt of 
the chasms, the white waxy flowers, more like white hyacinths than orchids, make a beautiful contrast to the wildness of 
the scene. In the low grounds it is replaced by D. gracilicaule. It flowers in June and July. 

EXPLANATION OP PLATE. 

Dendrobium Moorei. Pig. 1. Top of column, from the front. 2. Top of column, from the side. 3. Labellum, 
from the side and front. 4. Plowcr, from the front (natural size). 6. Flower, from the front. 6. Column, from side and 
front. 7. Pollen-masses in anther, and pollen-masses. 


















PART 1. 

JULY, 18 73. 






PART 2 


MARCH, 1876. 











PART 3. 

JUNE, 1877. 











PART 4. 

JULY, 1878. 





PART 5. 

OCTOBER, 1879. 







PART 6. 

JULY, 1880. 





PART 7. 


OCTOBER, 1882.